Moving and Door Size: What to Do When It Won’t Fit

December 10th, 2010 by

Maneuvering objects to help deal with a door size is a common task on moving day. To many beginners, and even some professionals, making items fit through a front door or other aperture can be tricky. Successful house moving often requires a tape measure and some ingenuity. Here are some of the common tips for getting bigger furniture into a house or apartment.

Disassemble Detachable Pieces

One of the first things most experienced drivers do with big furniture is evaluate the entire piece for detachable parts that will make the item smaller and better able to fit through doorways. This includes taking the legs off of sofas, tables and other big cargo. This sometimes requires tools. Large bolts may hold pieces together. When you have figured out the assembly of a larger furniture item, you’re much more likely to make it fit.

Measure Doorway Spaces Against Furniture Dimensions

Another common technique, measuring, is a primary way to ensure that a particular piece will fit through a doorway. When you have horizontal and vertical measurements for the doorway, take all of available measurements for the piece of furniture, and think about how these figures might compliment each other. Then put your ideas into practice.

Go from Different Angles

Part of the above measuring process is looking at whether a different angle may be more effective for a piece of furniture. This is particularly important for sofas, where diagonal positioning can enable a larger piece to go through a smaller or thinner doorway. If you have enough labor to shift furniture around while it’s in transit, you’ll have a better chance of successfully getting big pieces inside.

Evaluate and Free up Interior Depth

Another element of moving large furniture is getting the maximum amount of horizontal space inside the home. This allows movers to angle pieces even more to get them through doorways, and shift interior items around as necessary.

Observe Interior Obstacles

Bannisters, interior walls and other obstacles can come into play after the furniture goes through the door. Look at these items before the move, and you’ll be able to figure out whether you want to take a particular piece upstairs, or leave it in the front room.

Go through a Window

As a last resort,  movers can avoid the doorway entirely and use an alternate route. On the first floor, you can sometimes simply open a larger window and move items in that way. On a higher floor, movers might use a lift system to get big furniture into upper rooms. This can require a lot of muscle, so be sure you have the manpower and equipment to handle one of these specialized moving situations.

All of the above can come in handy when it looks like a big sofa, appliance or cabinet might not make it into a new home. A combination of adequate tools, time and free hands can make all of the difference in a successful move.

Tags: ,

Related Content


Leave a Reply