Are You Breathing Healthful Air?

September 3rd, 2007 by

When choosing an apartment, diligent renters pepper landlords and real-estate agents with questions about square footage, amenities and security deposits. However, few renters consider the air quality in potential apartments. Most of us don’t think about the quality of the air we breathe at all — until we begin to suspect that the air in our apartments might be making us sick. As we learn more about how air quality affects common diseases like asthma and with new concerns about “sick building syndrome” in office complexes, more and more people are starting to take air quality seriously.

Common Pollutants

Poor air quality can be caused by a number of different pollutants. In buildings with poor air filtration, common pollutants from outside industrial sites and automobile congestion can stagnate indoors and contribute to respiratory trouble. Carbon monoxide, which is deadly at high enough concentrations, can be produced when fuel-burning appliances malfunction. Radon, a radioactive gas that sometimes enters homes and apartments from the soil underneath the building, is one of the leading causes of lung cancer. Mold and mildew can contaminate air filtration systems and release spores into the air. Along with pollen and dust mites, molds and mildew are key causes of allergies and asthma. The list goes on and on and can make you feel sick just thinking it.

Testing Your Air

If you suspect a problem with the air quality in your apartment, there’s no shortage of products available in stores and online to help you determine which, if any, pollutants are present in your apartment. Several companies sell at-home testing kits that test for mold, some species of bacteria and fungal spores. Some companies will send inspectors to your apartment to test for mold, fungi and bacteria. If the general air quality in your apartment is poor, you can also buy self-contained air filtration units that span a wide range as far as price and quality. Of course, these filters, tests and kits can be quite expensive.

Unfortunately, you may not be able to rely on your landlord to cover the most of these costs. You’ll have more luck if you can argue that your landlord’s negligence or problems with building maintenance have led to the poor air quality in the apartment. A patch of mold and mildew in your ceiling might have been caused by a leaky pipe, one your landlord should have repaired. The terms of your lease may spell out the landlord’s responsibility for air quality obligations your landlord has to protect for the health of tenants in the building.

Your landlord may also be open to installing carbon monoxide monitors, which are quickly becoming almost as common as smoke detectors. Whether your landlord agrees to cover the cost or not, you should get one of these. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is can kill you before you’re even aware of its presence. You can find them for less than $20, which is definitely worth the peace of mind.

Air Filters

If your building is equipped with central air, your air conditioning system may require its own set of filters that need to be regularly changed, usually at least four times a year. Responsibilities regarding maintaining the HVAC system and its filters are often spelled out in the lease. Many tenants assume that changing the air filter is the responsibility of the landlord, but often the landlord is only responsible for maintaining the air conditioning system itself. Tenants may be expected to change the filters, a fact that landlords don’t always make clear when tenants sign the lease. A dirty air filter not only makes the apartment air dirty, it also makes the HVAC system work harder to cool the apartment, resulting in increased energy bills.

If you don’t have central air but want to improve air quality and circulation, you can purchase a self-contained air filtration unit or air purifier. These are often sold at home supply stores like Bed, Bath & Beyond, or specialty stores such as The Sharper Image. A wide range of apartment air-filtering systems is available, so it makes sense to do your research before you purchase anything.

Look for the CADR (Clean Air Delivery Rating) of the unit. The CADR is a standard rating of how well the unit functions, with a higher number indicating a stronger purification power. You can also look for HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filters, which remove over 99 percent of airborne particles over .3 micrometers in size.

All of these purchases can make filtering the air in your apartment expensive. If you’re on a tight budget, a well-placed (and clean) window fan can make a big difference and improve your apartment airflow. Letting sunlight and fresh air in through the windows may not seem like a particularly effective remedy, but sunlight can actually help eliminate dust mites — one of the major bad-air culprits in many apartments.

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39 Responses to “Are You Breathing Healthful Air?”

  1. Guest Says:

    I HAVE LIVED IN MY APARTMENT NOW FOR 6 MONTHS AND JUST RECENTLY I HAD A PROFESSIONAL COME AND “CLEAN” THE AIR DUCTS IN THE ENTIRE APARTMENT. WHAT PROMPTED ME TO DO SO WAS THE MILDEWY SMELL THAT CIRCULATED THROUGHOUT THE APARTMENT WHEN THE A/C CUT ON. IT WAS HARD TO BREATH, I WAS ALWAYS FEELINGS SICK, AND MY PETS DEVELOPED THIS WEIRD CONSTANT COUGH. NO ONE SMOKES IN MY HOUSE SO I KNEW IT HAD TO BE THE AIR. AT ANY RATE, THIS PROFESSIONAL TOLD ME, AND NOTATED ON RECEIPT, THAT MY INSULLATION IS FULL OF MOLD AND MILDEW, AND IS AN UNSUTIBLE LIVING ENVIROMENT.” BEFORE THE FIRST NIGHT PASSED MY APARTMENT HAD A SMALL FLOOD IN THE KITCHEN DOWMNSTAIRS WHILE WATER FILLED IN ALL OF MY LIGHT FIXTURES IN MY UPSTAIRS BATHROOM. MAINTENENCE JUST DUMPED THE WATER AND THREW A SHINGLE OVER THE ROOF PROBLEM. I SUBMITTED WORK ORDERS ON TOP OF WORK ORDERS TO GET THE WATER OUT OF THE CEILING, AND EVEN WROTE TWO LETTERS TO MANAGEMENT COMPLAINING ABOUT THIS ISSUE, EVEN AFTER THE WATER CAME BACK A FEW DAYS AFTER THE “REPAIR.” THEY JUST TOLD ME NOT TO USE MY LIGHTS UNTIL IT STOPPED RAINING. THEN I DEVELOPED A SERIOUS PROBLEM WITH KNATS! IT WASN’T JUST A FEW OF THEM. IT WAS A WHOLE COLONY AND IT SEEMED LIKE THEY WERE BREEDING AND HATCHING EVERY SINGLE DAY. THE NUMBERS JUST KEPT GROWING! YEAH, MANAGEMENT SENT THE PEST CONTROL GUY WHICH WORKS FOR A DAY OR TWO, BUT THEN THEY CAME BACK BOUNTIFUL AND MORE AGGRESSIVE. MANAGEMENT DOES NOT CARE AND THEY STILL WANT TO HOLD ME TO MY LEASE AGREEMENT. THIS IS REDICULOUS. ALL THEY SAY IS, “I HAVE KNATS TOO.” I AM SUPPOSED TO BE OKAY WITH THAT? MY PETS WON’T EVEN EAT THE FRESH FOOD I PUT OUT FOR THEM AND THE KNATS ARE GETTING INTO MY FOOD IN THE REFRIGERATOR, AND MY BREAD GOES MOLDY IF IT SITS LONGER THAN WEEK. I WONDER IF ANYONE CAN GIVE ME ANY ADVISE? IF SO, PLEASE EMAIL ME AT pissed.off00@yahoo.com. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

  2. Guest Says:

    Why not call city /county health officials to inspect your building?

  3. Guest Says:

    In April,2007, my fiance & I moved to THESE apartments.The landscape &
    scenery is beautiful; upon moving in, we noticed a dripping noise in the upstairs
    bathroom.We made a complaint with the rent office & they sent maintenence out to
    inspect the problem.We were told that the noise that we hear is: what he referred
    to as: an over flow in the plumbing lines. After living there for three months;
    not only did the dripping noise became louder,we began to notice a foul odor,
    coming from the a/c unit.Each time we turned on our air conditioner;we’d smell this
    odor that is similar to: a sour mop that has been sitting in mildew.On the second
    complaint,maintenence returned & they ordered a deodorizer to spray into the unit.
    2 weeks later, the odor returned & i had to get something in writing from my doctor,
    to take to the rental office.So from there;the apartment manager placed a work
    order for:the unit & duct work to be cleaned.These guys came out & they cleaned the ducts & they cleaned the carpet.A week later; the odor returned & at that point;
    I threatened to call my attorney, so: the apartment manager had the health department
    to come out & test the air quality.however, since then the odor has gotten worst.We haven’t been running our a/c but we can now smell the odor while it’s off.We have to close all of our a/c vents to trap the odor inside,but it’s not helping.This odor is so bad until it’s embedded into our clothes & furniture.. Each time I return home,I can notice this odor as soon as I open my door.when I go upstairs into my bedroom;my sinuses become imflamed & the close up on me,making it very hard for me to breathe. I suffer from a very serious & chronic sinusitus condition,I’ve had three surguries.I can not be around: heavy dust,smoke nor any type of air borne pollutants. of course,these things are everywhere,outside; but it is very dangerous to my health;for me to be subjected to these things in a closed environment.Since I’ve been here,My sinusitus condition is not improving.I WILL NOT DISCLOSE THE FINDINGS FROM THE
    AIR QUALITY TEST that was done in Sept.2007 & I will not recommend THESE
    apartments to those who has:sinusitus,respiratory illnesses nor allergic reactions.
    The managers has treated our complaints as if they were not serious & they did not
    do anything to correct this problem.They’ll allow us to: break our lease without being charged for it; but they won’t give us our deposit back.They’ll relocate us to a new apartment at A NEW UNIT & put our deposit towards it;but we’ll have higher rent. WE WILL BE SEEKING TO SUE OUR LANDLORD FOR NEGLIGENCE. THIS APARTMENT HAS BEEN MAKING ME SICK & THEY TRYED TO COVER IT UP.

  4. Guest Says:

    I would like to say to the person that commented their story above… My husband and I living in an apt. in Nashville and I have five air cleaners in here and spend hundreds of dollars, including buying high priced air filters for the HVAC unit and I Change them every 30 days. I have asthma and allergies and since moving in this apt. they are 100% worse and i’ve been to emergency room manyh times for Breathing treatments. They had the Ventilation system cleaned, then the Morons had them use a chemical with a stong ODOR to clean it..and its been over 2 weeks and still every time I walk in my lungs close up and I wheeze and cant breathe…. the odor is not a BAD odor but a Clean odor but I cant breathe at all.. I am now having headaches..its FAR worse since they decided to clean the vents.. They didnt vacume that stuff out evidnetally and peices of junk are falling out of our vents to the counter which look like Dry wall and dust junk… I’m so Angry and to top it off i’ve had to stay w/ my parents at their house,d rive an hour to/from work further and spend gas money to do that..and not live here and STILL they expect me to pay a full montsh rent? I think not. i’m ready for legal action… WHERE DO YOU BUY THESE tests or who can come out and test the air?

  5. Guest Says:

    Oh my I am having the same situation with our apartment but it is regards to closed up vents that allow smoke to seep in and it actually is so hazy at times in here that I swear I am living in a bar. I too have serious health issues and allergies and asthma and I have to stay with relatives when it gets really bad. Once I leave my apartment, I can breath. The minute I enter it, I block up, and panic if I can not breath. How do you convince landlords to take these complaints seriously? Same dealfor us, they will “allow” us to pay a 3 month buyout and get our security back, but it is their apartments that are making us sick? Why should we pay?

  6. Guest Says:

    HELP! I live in a home and I have the expensive air filters and wash and change them reguarly. I can’t breath sometimes. It’s like walking into a smokey bar – it’s that choking feeling. I’ve spent a couple of hundred dollars on having the air tested and everything came back fine. Does anyone know what’s going on?

  7. Guest Says:

    The apartment I live in is constantly filled with 2nd hand cigarette smoke from the guy in the apartment underneath me. He must smoke three packs a day. It comes up through the room where they put the A/C unit and from under the sink in the kitchen. When I go to visit my mother in Florida, my luggage smells like I’ve comes straight from a bar. The landlord’s take on the situation is that she can’t do anything because that would be telling him what he can and cannot do in his apartment. Unfortunately, I can’t afford to move so I now have asthma and bad sinus problems.

    There should be a law that says you can’t force someone else to have to ingest your cancerous addiction day after day.

  8. Guest Says:

    We live at the Regatta at Lake Lynn Apartments in Raleigh, NC. Recently we have had some problems with our air quality. We asked maintenance to come out and look at the vents because we are seeing large amounts of dust and black stuff coming out of our vents, but on the first visit they only looked at and cleaned the intake area. Then when we complained again, in writing, they looked in the vents, saw the dust and debris, but now are refusing to fix it. I was told that if they cleaned our vents, they would have to clean the whole property’s vents and that they were not set up with a vendor in order to do that type of work. Then the property manager called me and told me that the company who inspects and cleans the chimneys does duct cleaning…so they do have a vendor who can do it, they just do not want to. My guess is because of the expense. Meanwhile, my fiance, who is allergic to dust mites, is ill every single day he is in this apartment. He gets headaches, congestion, nose bleeds, etc. Do we have any legal options that anyone knows about? One would think that the owners of the property would take care of their tenants and their property, but they are not doing so.

    It took almost three months to get a door fixed…we have called four times about our ice maker not working and three maintenance visits later it is still not working. We are not waiting on a return call from our fourth call. If you are thinking about moving in here, I would think twice. It appears to me that the property owners do not care about their tenants health and well-being.

    If anyone has any advice, I would appreciate it…

  9. Guest Says:

    I was living in some apart call blossom park apt in orlando fl. I had a lick in the apart witch it cause me mold and fungus on the wall the apart smell very bad I notice that when I fist move there my son started to get sick. The AC had mold the landlord when to clean the a AC with a toothbrush an just brush it off. Then the mold started showing because of the leak I have my son that has asthmas I told the landlord I cannot keep living there because of my son he fix the wall but the ac still has mold he does not want to give me half of my deposit back. What can I do. sdt1987@yahoo.com

  10. Guest Says:

    If you’re having problems with secondhand smoke:

    Block openings around bathroom and kitchen pipes with spray foam (make sure you get your landlord’s permission IN WRITING or they may consider that “damage” against your security deposit) or stuff crumpled newspaper in the openings and affix duct tape around them.

    Ask the landlord to check any vents you have in your apartment. The maintenance guy at my friend’s apartment discovered a stuck valve in the bathroom vent made all the the smoke and other pollutants the neighbors in all the apartments below her (she’s on the top floor) sent out from their bathroom vents blew into my friend’s place instead of outside.

    Ask the landlord to make the SMOKERS buy and use adequate air purifiers in their apartments. Disagreeable odors may be considered the same as the “no loud noise” policy in leases.

    Keep a written record of dates, times, and effects the smoke has on you. If possible, get a letter from a doctor stating your breathing problems. Your landlord may be forced to provide smoke-free living quarters for you under the Americans with Disabilites Act (the way companion animals are allowed in no pet buildings). If they don’t, you may be able to sue them for moving costs, odor removal from your furniture, and any other costs you incur, as well as “pain and suffering” if you’re forced to move for health reasons.

    Most states have “anti-retaliation” laws that prevent your landlord from evicting you or raising your rent to ridiculous heights for asserting your right to clean and healthy surroundings–including the right to breathe without secondhand smoke in the air.

  11. Guest Says:

    Just a question…why did I have to pay an extra deposit and sign an addendum to the lease saying I’d keep the cat box clean to “prevent odor” when the management says cigarette smoke seeping into my apartment is OK? At least my cat doesn’t burn holes in carpets and counters and doesn’t throw her cat litter over the balcony to litter the lawn.

  12. Guest Says:

    We moved into a new home and I began having the very same sympton. My husband, however, did not and has not. I have had the sensation at other places (not new) and also at my daughter’s new home. I would like to know what is going on also. I have been tested for allergies and am allergic to NOTHING.

  13. Guest Says:

    Well, this issue recently came up regarding my apartment as well. The building is 10 years old, I think the ductwork should have been cleaned. My apartment manager said no. I did read up on ductwork at the US EPA website and feel better now. There is no evidence that dirty ductwork is harmful at all, due to the fact that the dust sticks to the walls. More pollutants are coming in and out with me and my dog than the ductwork. I had a company lined up to clean the ductwork-which I was gong to to pay for myself-but canceled themafter reading what the EPA says. Look it up…very useful info!

  14. Guest Says:

    Two more things that can help. Check under your radiators to see if there are gaps and fill them. Also get some foam inserts that you put behind outlet and light switch covers (about $5 did my whole 2-BR apartment). I think there supposed to be for the cold, but they also keep a lot of smoke out.

  15. Guest Says:

    Toxoplasmosis is a diseases associated with the litter box, of special concern to pregnant women and people with a suppressed imune system.
    A dirty litter box also makes the spread of foul air containing bad bacteria which can lead to colds, flus and in some cases a full blown disease.
    Of course the same is true (with way more scientific research conducted) of second hand smoke, however a dirty litter box has never had an American icon such as the Marlboro Man thus it is still rightly seen as foul and harmful, whereas smoking is not quite there yet.
    Rebecca McGrane
    Me@RebeccaMcGrane.com
    877-TakeJP2

  16. Guest Says:

    My doctor told me chronic bronchitis caused something like scar tissue to build up in my bronchial tubes, narrowing the air passages. My acid reflux causes swelling of the tubes, restricting air flow even more. Add secondhand smoke irritants and I’m like a fish out of water. The expensive allergy pills and an inhaler to open the airways is only enough to keep me alive. After four months of having to sleep in a chair to keep breathing (the landlord wouldn’t let me out of my lease early and I can’t afford two rents), I’m finally moving to a smoke-free building next week.

  17. Guest Says:

    Don’t cats have to eat an infected animal to get that disease? That’s not likely to happen in an apartment-dwelling cat unless the building is infested with rodents.

    Besides, unless someone has lots of cats and/or is neglecting the litterbox in a big way, the smell getting into other apartments will take weeks. Smoke can get into another apartment within minutes and someone can have an asthma attack from cigarette smoke within seconds.

  18. Guest Says:

    PLACE LOTS OF PLANTS IN YOUR APARTMENT.

    If you are having problems in your apartment or home of any kind with respect to the quality of air, adding certain kinds of plants that are good at removing air pollutants will significantly improve the quality of the air within 24 hours. Each room in your apartment should have at least three of the following plants, which have been identified by NASA as cleaning the air the best:

    1. Boston fern
    2. Areca palm
    3. Lady palm
    4. Bamboo palm
    5. Rubber plant
    6. Dracaena Janet Craig
    7. English Ivy
    8. Dwarf date palm
    9. Ficus alii
    10. Peace lily

    EVEN IF YOU OR YOUR CHILD HAVE ASTHMA, as I do, you should still use these plants as they will improve the air and will not cause asthma problems. They may bother your asthma when you bring the plants home and place them in your home or apartment, but this is simply the pollen rubbing off on your skin and clothes. Take a shower immediately afterwards, and you will be fine.

    The plants above are listed in order of effectiveness, according to NASA – the Boston fern is the most effective. Some of the plants will have a musty smell – this is normal. Do not over-water the plants as this will cause standing water in the pot to allow mold to grow. Keep the soil damp, but without standing water. All of these plants will remove formaldehyde and other air pollutants. They also release what are known as “negative ions” into the air which help your overall health and sense of well-being. Negative ions also help to reduce dust.

    Finally, plants will help to ensure that the level of, or lack of, humidity in your apartment is at a steady and appropriate level to prevent mold growth and dust mites. And no, you cannot have too many plants – they will not pose any harm to your health that I am aware of.

  19. Guest Says:

    I have lived in the same apartment for a few years in Morgantown WV. Ever since the first summer I have complained that my air conditioning unit is not sufficient to cool the apartment. Well thanks to global warming (lol), these last 2 summers have been the most mild so I have only mildly complained. However, when the temp went up into the 80′s, the temp in my apartment SOARED! It was so bad, that they came in and put in two window units last summer.

    This summer…more of the same. Only a new problem, the lines would jam up and my carpet would get wet. I complained again, and again…finally they replaced my unit. I travel alot and am gone for long periods of time. I came back found my apartment at 58 degrees (yay it works) and my carpets soaked really, really bad…making my bedroom unusable. I only paid half month the rent to emphasize my displeasure and they are forcing me to pay full amount.

    Now? The carpets have dried, I am sure there is mold on it, I am sleeping on the couch (when I am there) and they are saying they will replace the carpet.

    Questions:
    1) What legal recourse do I have?
    2) I would think that if I would decide to leave, they have no legal grounds to enforce the lease because I think I have decent grounds for a lawsuit.

    Can anyone help?

  20. Guest Says:

    Well I guess you anti-smokers should have thought about this before banning smoking in parks, out-side coffee shops,etc. Now, the smoker’s only place to smoke is inside. DAH!

  21. Guest Says:

    I just went through a situation dealing with mold in the apartment too. So I know a bit about how to go about dealing with unresponsive management. I got out of my lease without penalty by doing these things:

    First – you need to check your landlord tenant laws for your state (I live in a different state than you). But I am almost positive that you cannot legally withhold rent (in my state you cannot).

    Second – if you haven’t already done so – you need to start putting every communication to your landlord in WRITING. That is sometimes the ONLY way that these places will respond. To give you an idea of why – my state’s laws specifically state that the problem starts only when the first written notice is given. So if you wait a month, and haven’t notified them in writing, then legally what happened in that month doesn’t exist.

    Third – if you give written notice of your complaints, and they still do not respond, then you can do any of the following: 1) do a home mold test, 2) get a professional mold inspector (if you have funds to do this), 3) complain to the BBB, the Attorney General’s office, etc.

    My situation resulted in the management voluntarily offering to let me out of my lease without penalty once I provided them with positive, elevated, and unusual conditions of mold from the home mold test I did. I wrote letters along the way as well, and am now filing complaints to try to recover some of my money (dr’s bills, testing, etc).

    Good luck, and hope this helps!

  22. Guest Says:

    can mildew and mold be harmful if the doors r open in our building? 4 unit building. 2 vacant with mildew and mold going crazy in there and my landlord hasn’t done nothing about it. he has left the doors open

  23. Guest Says:

    AMEN times 1 gazillion!

  24. Guest Says:

    How about if you smokers stop thinking you’re entitled to do something that is killing the rest of us. At least heroine addicts are only killing themselves.

  25. Guest Says:

    I too live in an apartment where 2nd hand somke is causing allergy/asthma problems. It seems to be a common problem among renters. It might be that the only possible way to solve this problem is to contact local and state representatives and see about creating a new law, which could possibly require a petition. I urge everyone to start this process so asthma/allergy sufferers no longer have to be in misery because of others’ addictions.

  26. che Says:

    what do people think about vent free heaters?

  27. David Says:

    I live in a complex called green tree apt… and I have recently discovered a large amount of mold growing in my air ducts, I didn’t think anything of it until the past few months me and my pregnant fiance have been getting constant headaches while in our apt, and when we leave the apt were fine, we have complained to the office about mold on the vents in our bathroom a few times and they tell us to clean it with bleach, so I recently took one of the vents off to find a large amount of mold growing throught our whole air duct system… so I told the office and they explained to me that it is in my lease on how I am supossed to clean the ducts… the issue is that the air ducts are completly fiberglass and as a former construction worker the only way to get rid of mold in these types of ducts is to remove them (if your apt trys to pull this move on you, you can only effectivly clean steel airducts) I went to the office with pics of the mold and before and after pics of the vents that I personaly cleaned, and they said they would take care of it. so later that day I had a maitinace guy come in and all they did was vacum acouple areas and spray killz into the ducts… The mold is still there and its not completley taken care of… And on top of everything they are trying to pin the cause on us, when it is clearly a matence issue, when we moved in the drip pan on our air system wasnt installed properly causeing constant leaking, not to mention The large amount of build up of the mold and acouple of the vents had been painted previously… Im at a loss for what to do, all I can think of is contact the local building inspector… I would love any help i can get… email me a cbyerspace@aol.com

  28. Jen Says:

    From the day I moved into the apartment I’m living in now, I have had chronic sinusitis, problems with ears feeling full, headaches, constant stuffy nose, fatigue, lack of concentration..an overall lazy feeling, and my daughters have been the same way. My oldest has gotten bronchitis 3 times , and youngest even got pneumonia the past 2 years! Well, this past week, I discovered black mold in my window frames! I’ve never been this sick for this long before, so I’ve never been exposed to mold, or even knew what to look for until i was complaining to a coworker about how sick we’ve been for going on 3 years now, and that’s when he said it sounded like I had mold. I also noticed when I moved in, there was a big dark gray spot on my bathroom floor, which I assumed was water damage, but I was oblivious that it could cause mold, so I would be willing to bet it’s all under the flooring and since it’s running up the sides of the window frames as well, it’s probably in my walls! Scary to think of! Anyway, things always get swept under the rug with our management, or if they did send maintenace out to clean it, they would claim it wasn’t even mold. I can’t afford $300.00 right now for an official mold inspector to come out and the Health Department said all they would be able to do is tell me it’s mold! They do not identify what type it is or remove it, so what good are THEY? Last night I got more and more worried about that darn black mold, so I went through and sprayed tons of a bleach and water mix to at least kill the mold I could see. I’m going to move out as soon as I find another place, and I dare my landlord not to let me out of my lease! I’ll simply tell him. “ok. I’ll stay until my lease is up, but I’m going to have the Health Department come check these apartments~! OH and by the way, the unit is over 35 years old, so i think I’ll request a lead check as well! That ought to do the trick! Has anyone else had these exact same health symptoms caused by mold? I welcome your feedback!!

  29. Krisit Says:

    My 2 sons rent a house with two other students. hey attend FSU. I along with my oldest son expressed concern to landlord when they first moved in about mold in bathroom. The landlord said he would take care of it. By Christmas, Black Mold started appearing in my sons closet. Once again his landlord made a attempt by placing a humidifier and claimed he found the problem and fixed it. All four boys complain of soar throats, fatigue , etc. More black mold has surfaced. I am afraid for their health. What can I do? Is there a Environmental agency in Florida that will investigate and help resolve this? They are not financially able to pay for any Black Mold Companies to come in and inspect. I appreciate any advice in this matter. Thank You!!!

  30. susan Says:

    i live in del pasohieghts duplex type studios. for at least 3 weeks there has bee standing water under, and between mine and neighbors. . im starting to get black mold in my bathroom plus since the problem, im having resp. issues, and just feel like crap. im worried im breathing in dangerous air every day. how can i get it inspected by code enforcement? i cant afford to move and dont want my landlord getting my name as the one who reported.

  31. Anonymous Says:

    I live in a large apartment complex, i have lived in this apartment for 2 years, for the past six months i have been getting soar throat and stuffy nose. the heating and ac is not adequate. i recently unscrewed the air duct vent which is located in the living room because i noticed a lot of dust coming from the vent. inside of that vent was so dirty i got scared. But after examining it carefully i think it is a job i can do myself. how do i clean the air duct.

  32. Thomas Says:

    I live in a house thats been turned into apartments and mine only has 1 window and the back bedrooms the humidity stays high really high there has been alittle mold in one of them on the wall and around the window and the window always has moisture on it.thing is since living here for the past 5 years i seem that i get sick alot i do have asmah and a devated septum but im always sick since bein here …

  33. Carri Says:

    I live in an apartment building on the top floor and cannot afford to move anywhere. It is supposed to be a non smoking building, but the manager, who smokes, told me that the tenants are allowed to smoke in their apartments. Well, the smoke never stays in their apartments. The woman next door smokes and it comes right into my kitchen and living room. Someone under me smokes and I end up smelling it in the bedroom, and the people across from me smoke. I’ve been getting terrible sinus and asthma problems. I’ve had nosebleeds from it. I have post nasal drip with coughing from it. I’m really sick from it. And I’m so upset that there’s nothing I can do to make them enforce that it’s supposed to be a non smoking building. No one cares that they make us sick. And my place smells of the smoke, I think my walls are yellowing from it. I open my windows when I can, but we’ve had cold winter weather and I can’t always do that. Why aren’t there strong laws that forbid smoking in apartment buildings? Why are we forced to breathe their smoke into our bodies? It’s horrible.

  34. eli Says:

    We rent commercial space next to a seafood shop, the odors are horrible. Can we be getting sick from the bacteria in the air, there are days the air is so dense and thick with the smell. Landlord is doing very little to correct. Oh and does anyone know of a test to see if air is bad. Its not mold so we wouldn’t use that type of air quality test.

  35. dl Says:

    My better half and I have been in our Atlanta apartment for just over a year and a half.
    When we moved in we noticed that the air ducts and AC unit itself were very dirty.
    When the weather turned hot we turned on the AC and had difficulty breathing, sinusitus and sore throats.
    I have since then noticed that atic air travels into our appartment through the openings for ceiling fans, outlets, lighting fixtures,vents and gaps around fixtures etc.
    We are on the top floor and it gets really hot!
    This air that flows in through the ceiling is hot and unbreathable. I tried to smell it once around a bathroom vent, and my body convulced rejecting the bad air. I also noticed little spiders coming in through the gaps and fixtures like ceiling fans. the dust in our apartment is primarily the same material in the atic insulation.
    So we sealed it all up as best we could and went and bought two AC units, one window and one portable.
    Now it is cooler but the air still is bad bad smell and I am still getting sick.Every morning sore throat, coughing and sinusitus.
    Went to the hospital last week and they treated me for respitory infection and bronchitis.
    I am scared and worried this is really huring us.
    What can we do to either get the landlord to move us or let us out of our lease?
    Any advice would be appriciated.

  36. mary ann tomaszewski Says:

    i need someone to come to my apartment for an inspection – please can you help me?

  37. Sherry Says:

    I live in KCMO 64131, had air test done and it is over 5000 on mold count & legal limits are 400. Anyone else in this Zip code with mold tests at apartment please let me know asap. Can refer you to Certified Mold Expert to test for you. Filed case with City over 2 weeks ago….still not been out & complex thinks they can simply ignore their issue which has caused great illness to my health & my dog….? This complex is in huge code violations and yet they want that rent check every month, while renters suffer….? Are wwe still in the early 19th century or what? Laws mean nothing as noone mandates they are followed. What gives…? The ironry of this is from a movie, right? The only answer is you need money…then you do not have these issues……?

  38. missy Says:

    Sorry to hear of your health and your dog. I live in 64129 and just had neighborhood preservation come out the other day and fined the complex i live in for mold in my apt. I am also waiting on the health dept to come out to test the air. I would love to converse with you as we are going thru the same thing with mold. mine has been for 6 1/2 yrs and i jus discivered it a week ago. my health has deteriorated and i am unable to work. no ssdi, no income and i was making 8-10k per month before this illness from mold took over. If you do reply to me plz leave a subject line so i will know to read it.

  39. Louise Mason Says:

    I have just moved in a nice apartment except the tenant upstairs has a cat. Unfortunately my nice apartment smell like cat urine and feces. I have deodorizers and sprays all over my apartment and I have shampooed my carpets to try to get rid of the smell. I believe that the smell has been in my apartment for awhile because its hard to get rid of. There use to be a old lady that lived in the apartment before I did and management said she didn’t have a cat. I don’t want friends and family over because of the odor. The only thing that management has done was to tell the tenant to clean his litter box. That’s a little to late because the smell is already settled in my apartment. Now I am experiencing headaches from the odor. I have be responsible in paying my rent on time and following the rules of the apartment but who takes responsibility of making sure that I don’t have to live in a unsanitary place.

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